Brockton Audubon Preserve

In 2012 Wildlands Trust acquired 125 acres of vacant land on the western boundary of the City of Brockton through a transfer from Brockton Audubon Society. Brockton Audubon Society was founded in 1919 by a group of residents concerned with the mission to protect birds and stimulate interest in nature study. Over time active membership dwindled and the two remaining trustees asked Wildlands Trust to accept the donation of the Brockton Audubon conservation land and assume responsibility for the stewardship of this property. This is our first “urban” preserve. As requested, Wildlands retained the name of Brockton Audubon Preserve.

DESCRIPTION:

Stone walls run through the site and provide evidence of its prior agricultural use. Once cleared, these fields were used primarily for pasture. Most of the trees on the site are less than 50 years old. Other signs of prior use include barbed wire scars on trees and traces of old farm roads. Glacially deposited stones and boulders litter several areas of the site. One huge glacial erratic, 20 feet high, is located in the northeast portion of the site.

This property is a diamond-in-the-rough and provides a great opportunity for the protection of land in an urban setting within our service area while creating a much needed urban sanctuary for the people of Brockton and surrounding communities. Nestled within a heavily urbanized area, with approximately 250,00 residents within a 5-mile radius, this preserve ensures the protection of the property’s important natural habitats and provides for passive outdoor recreation for the community in addition to providing excellent opportunities for environmental education in conjunction with local schools and community groups. The diversity of habitats is outstanding and is being developed to encourage a range of outdoor activities.

Thanks to its location the Brockton Audubon Preserve’s close proximity to the Easton Conservation Commission’s Ames Property and the Brockton Conservation Commission’s Stone Farm, provides a vital link within a larger 300-acre wildlife corridor for many terrestrial and avian species, including migratory birds.